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Tuesday, April 12, 2011

Identifying Your Job Strengths

Knowing how to define  your skills for an employer can help you get a job or promotion that you really want. To do this well, you need to be clear about your goals. What kind of work do you want to be doing? What skills do you must want to use in the job you get next? Follow the steps below to draw out your strengths and abilities that will interest an employer.

Write a short biography-a short three to five page account of your life. Include all the events you found significant. Include episodes from your early life. Include all the events you found significant. And also leisure interests along with whatever work experience you think relevant. Say what you liked and did not like. Say what you accomplished and what you are proud of. Describe what you learned or gained from difficult experiences you think relevant. Say what you liked and did not like. Say what you accomplished and what you are proud of. Describe what you learned or gained from difficult experiences or moments of failure. Focus your biography around no less than seven and no more than ten key events. Read your biography and think about the skills it tells you about. Which of these will an interview find interesting for your next job?




Learning assessment-Being able to describe your ability to learn is important for any job.Review what you have written and pick out five key skills or areas of knowledge that will be helpful in the job you want next.




Work assessment-Look back over the jobs you have held and list which you liked and disliked most. Say why. List the work that challenge you the most. Describe how these challenges helped develop skills you are use today. Now list which jobs you are prepared to do again, even if you are not paid for them. Say why. Review what you have written and pick out five key skills or areas of knowledge that will be helpful in the job you want next.




Life skills assessment-In times when you are not working, what do you really like to do? List the hobbies that interest and motivate you. Describe what you learned or gained from going to these places. List the places you have travelled to. Describe what you have learned or gained from going to these places. List any other activities that you enjoy. Say why. All that are important and can bring value to the way you approach the demands of a new job.




Assess your achievements-Now review everything you have written and use the headings below to group all your various skills into clearly defined categories. Try to ensure that each category includes at least one of your top ten achievements.




Management-list anything related to policy formulation, policy implementation, planning, budgeting, performance review, hiring or firing staff, project responsibilities, organisation, making presentations, helping others to develop their capabilities, skills or knowledge.

  • Qualifications: list training courses here as well as formal school diplomas or college degrees.
  • Documentation:list all the areas where you have used research, report-writing, summarising, or market study skills.
  • Technical:list skills such as knowledge of computing, operating machinery, driving and any knowledge you have related to such functional areas as sales, marketing, logistics, human resources, engineering or whatever.
  • Interpersonal: list here skills like communication, coaching, facilitation, problem-solving, negotiation, team-building, influencing, mentoring, conciliation and so on.
  • "Of note": list here skills which may be special to you and which you have not already included in any of the categories above-languages you speak, sporting accomplishments etc.
Narrow down your list against your goals-your list of marketable skills is now likely to be quite long. Think about the key demands of the job you want to get next and ask which skills an interview will value the most. Pick out the ten most important skills you can offer. Write a sentence to show how you have actively used this skill in the past. For example: "Delivered key project deliverable on time and 10% under budget". If you lack any skills, identify realistic ways for you to get these either by learning on the job or through training or development you can undertake before applying for the job.


Run a reality check-use your network of friends or colleagues to find someone who is doing the kind of job you want to do. Ask him or her to comment on your final list of ten skills. If they identify any gapes, ask them to help you define the skills you need to get. Alternatively, ask them what jobs they can recommend that match the skills you have. Ask friends and colleagues who know you well to check your list and give you feedback on what you need to take out or add in.




Make an application-Finally, when you are ready to apply for the job you want, use your list of skills   to write a covering letter that pinpoints why you are right for the job. This letter needs to be short, easy to read and entirely to the point. A good covering letter gives all the information an interviewer needs in three or four paragraphs at most. Use your skills categories to define the order in which you present all the information the interviewer needs to know about you want to look at your CV and then invite you to an interview.


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